Resources

August 2020

Did you know Gulf of Carpentaria coasts are critically important habitat for migratory shorebirds? These birds fly to Australia from as far away as Alaska every year, and rely on the worms, crabs, clams and other food of the Gulf mudflats and sandflats to fatten up for their journey. This collaboration between Carpentaria Land Council Aboriginal Corporation and Griffith University is showing just how important the Gulf is for these long-distance fliers.

August 2020

Flows from rivers into the Gulf of Carpentaria contain nutrients that support the growth and reproduction of important fisheries species like banana prawns and barramundi. This project investigated the importance of three rivers – the Mitchell, Flinders and Gilbert – to Gulf fisheries.

August 2020

Australia is home to 7% of the world’s mangroves, mostly located in the tropics. During the summer of 2015-6, one of the worst mangrove dieback events ever recorded devastated around 7400 hectares of mangroves along more than 1000 km of Gulf of Carpentaria coastline. This project produced a field guide for Indigenous rangers to monitor mangrove condition in the Gulf.

July 2020

This recording is from the 30 July 2020 launch of “Our Knowledge, Our Way: Indigenous-led approaches to strengthening and sharing our knowledge for land and sea management.”

The guidelines were created with contributions from more than 100 Indigenous individuals and organisations. The guidelines are based on 23 case studies that illustrate the critical principle that Indigenous people must decide what is best practice when working with their knowledge.

The guidelines were supported by North Australian Indigenous Land and Sea Management Alliance Ltd (NAILSMA) and CSIRO, and funded by the Northern Australia Hub of the Australian Government’s National Environmental Science Program (NESP). To learn more, and to see the full film, please visit:

July 2020

“Our Knowledge, Our Way: Indigenous-led approaches to strengthening and sharing our knowledge for land and sea management.”

The Our Knowledge, Our Way guidelines were created with contributions from more than 100 Indigenous individuals and organisations. They support a step-change in learning, by both Indigenous peoples and their partners, about best practice ways of working with Indigenous knowledge to look after land and sea Country.

The guidelines are based on 23 case studies that illustrate the critical principle that Indigenous people must decide what is best practice when working with their knowledge.

The guidelines were supported by North Australian Indigenous Land and Sea Management Alliance Ltd (NAILSMA) and CSIRO, and funded by the Northern Australia Hub of the Australian Government’s National Environmental Science Program (NESP).

To learn more, please visit the project page for Knowledge brokering for Indigenous land management.

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