Videos

August 2022

River flows in the Gulf of Carpentaria are an essential part of the lifecycle of numerous important fishery species in the Gulf, particularly prawns and barramundi. Hub research has built on long-term partnerships with these fisheries and used a combination of on-water sampling, data analysis and satellite imagery to improve understanding of the possible impacts of water extraction from Gulf rivers on these fisheries.

February 2022

There are an estimated 24 million #FeralPigs in Australia, and despite best efforts, their populations continue to increase & leave #wetland destruction in their wake. This video discusses specific wetland impacts and how on-ground efforts from organisations like Kalan Enterprises are addressing the problem.

Queensland Environment had identified pig damage as a major wetland issue, but until this NESP Northern Hub project, impacts of pig damage on specific wetland types had not been quantified. To better understand pig preferences for different wetland types, this project also contributed to a wetland typology to distinguish one wetland type from another.

This project then quantified the impact of feral species on wetland condition, the effectiveness of control measures on mitigating the threats to aquatic systems, and the subsequent impact on cultural wetland values.

February 2022

Hub research in the Gulf of Carpentaria aims to support sustainable development in the region. This includes research to inform water allocation planners and floodplain managers about the potential impacts of changes in flow on fisheries, migratory birds and biodiversity. Rivers that flow into the southern Gulf of Carpentaria are home to high-value ecosystems and support important recreational and commercial fisheries. With increasing development in the region, more information is needed to understand how future water development will impact on the health and productivity of floodplains and coastal areas.

December 2021

There are various development plans for the Fitzroy River catchment in Western Australia’s Kimberley region. Proposals for new developments include irrigated agriculture, increasing livestock production, carbon farming, extraction of mineral resources, nature and cultural tourism and many others. But how do we balance increased productivity, traditional uses and nature conservation? We are at an intersection where major decisions (from local to national levels) will be made regarding the future use of land and water resources. This requires a conversation about different development pathways for the region.

December 2021

There are various development plans for the Fitzroy River catchment in Western Australia’s Kimberley region. Proposals for new developments include irrigated agriculture, increasing livestock production, carbon farming, extraction of mineral resources, nature and cultural tourism and many others. But how do we balance increased productivity, traditional uses and nature conservation? We are at an intersection where major decisions (from local to national levels) will be made regarding the future use of land and water resources. This requires a conversation about different development pathways for the region.

October 2021

Final findings on knowledge synthesis to inform a national approach to fighting extinction

August 2021

The Northern Australia Environmental Resources Hub addressed key research questions to come up with practical, on-ground solutions to some of the north’s most complex environmental challenges. A transdisciplinary research approach has been at the heart of the hub. Integrating key research users – policy-makers and land managers including Traditional Owners and ranger groups – into the co-design of research projects has led to rapid uptake of research outcomes into land management practices and decision-making. The hub has produced this wrap-up video outlining these impacts from the perspectives of research users.

June 2021

Indigenous people face many challenges in managing their lands, including rapidly growing threats causing species extinctions and ecosystem losses. In response, many Indigenous groups are looking for ethical ways to design and apply innovative technologies to solve complex environmental management problems—specifically, technology that can work with Indigenous people’s stewardship practices and knowledge.

June 2021

In the face of growing interest in the waters of the Warlibiddi and Martuwarra (Margaret and Fitzroy Rivers) in north-west Western Australia, NESP research has partnered with Traditional Owners to increase our understanding of the rivers’ important cultural and environmental requirements. In this short film, senior Gooniyandi artist Mervyn Street shares his art and storytelling about the waters of the Warlibiddi and Martuwarra, and the waters’ vital significance to the Country and people’s lives.

Mervyn shares his wisdom to help viewers understand the rhythms of water and life and what they mean in his philosophical tradition. He also hopes it will help viewers understand the importance of the Warlibiddi and Martuwarra waters to not only sustain life, but also enable social connections and sustain culture for future generations.

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